Too young for osteoporosis

Her mouth gaped open. “But you’re too young to have osteoporosis, aren’t you?” We were sitting at the bus stop and a fellow passenger had asked what happened to my leg. Just nine months after my last foot fracture, I have broken the same toe (but luckily in a different place).

Since people are naturally curious, I don’t mind explaining that I’ve fractured a toe. They normally look incredulous that a broken toe joint means wearing a huge AirCast boot all the way up the knee. That’s when, depending on my energy levels, I explain that I have osteoporosis. If they ask more questions, I’ll tell them about the rheumatoid arthritis and Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome too. But sometimes, as I found before, it’s exhausting running through the same story time and again, so I’ll say “It’s a long story.” There are two reasons people look amazed – firstly, the notion that osteoporosis only affects older people, and secondly, that it’s possible to sustain a fracture without having an accident.

A few days ago I went to a support group for people with osteoporosis. We had a very good session on mindfulness. I found the practical guided exercise useful – being in the present moment, becoming more alert to things and stepping out of negative thoughts (about my body, pain levels etc). I liked the idea that ‘thoughts are like clouds; you are the blue sky and the clouds are going past’ – it is a great way to cultivate more positive feelings about a situation. Most of all, mindfulness is about experiencing the current time, not reminiscing about the past or planning the future. I’ve used these techniques before but it is much easier with a group. The challenge is to incorporate the practice into each day and to start to feel more in control of the situation (i.e. the foot fracture) than I did before.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s